Category : Social Science
Editor : Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN : 9781461457022
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 410
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Up until now, mountain ecosystems have not been closely studies by social scientists as they do not offer a readily defined set of problems for human exploitation as, do for instance, tropical forests or arctic habitats. But the archaeological evidence had shown that humans have been living in this type of habitat for thousands of year. From this evidence we can also see that mountainous regions are often frontier zones of competing polities and form refuge areas for dissident communities as they often are inherently difficult to control by centralized authorities. As a consequence they fuel or contribute disproportionately to political violence. But we are now witnessing changes and increasing vulnerability of mountain ecosystems caused by human activities. Human adaptability to mountain ecosystems This volume presents an international and interdisciplinary account of the exploitation of--and human adaptation to--mountainous regions over time. The contributions discuss human cultural responses to key physical and cultural stressors associated with mountain ecosystems, such as aridity, quality of soils, steep slopes, low productivity, as well as transient phenomena such as changing weather patterns, deforestation and erosion, and the possible effects of climate change. This volume will be of interest to anthropologists, ecologists and geologists as mountainous landscapes change fast and cultures disappear and they need to be recorded, and mountain regions are of interest for studies on environmental change and cultural responses of mountain populations provide clues for us all. Critical to understanding mountain adaptations is our comprehension of human decision-making and how people view short- and long-term outcomes.

Category : Social Science
Editor : Springer
ISBN : 1489994858
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 410
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Up until now, mountain ecosystems have not been closely studies by social scientists as they do not offer a readily defined set of problems for human exploitation as, do for instance, tropical forests or arctic habitats. But the archaeological evidence had shown that humans have been living in this type of habitat for thousands of year. From this evidence we can also see that mountainous regions are often frontier zones of competing polities and form refuge areas for dissident communities as they often are inherently difficult to control by centralized authorities. As a consequence they fuel or contribute disproportionately to political violence. But we are now witnessing changes and increasing vulnerability of mountain ecosystems caused by human activities. Human adaptability to mountain ecosystems This volume presents an international and interdisciplinary account of the exploitation of--and human adaptation to--mountainous regions over time. The contributions discuss human cultural responses to key physical and cultural stressors associated with mountain ecosystems, such as aridity, quality of soils, steep slopes, low productivity, as well as transient phenomena such as changing weather patterns, deforestation and erosion, and the possible effects of climate change. This volume will be of interest to anthropologists, ecologists and geologists as mountainous landscapes change fast and cultures disappear and they need to be recorded, and mountain regions are of interest for studies on environmental change and cultural responses of mountain populations provide clues for us all. Critical to understanding mountain adaptations is our comprehension of human decision-making and how people view short- and long-term outcomes.

Category : History
Editor : Boydell & Brewer
ISBN : 9781783275311
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 241
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First full survey of how transhumance operated in Ireland from the sixteenth century to the beginning of the twentieth.

Category : Science
Editor : Elsevier
ISBN : 9780128245392
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 356
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Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World presents a series of global case studies that examine how different Indigenous groups are dealing with various water management challenges and finding creative and culturally specific ways of developing solutions to these challenges. With contributions from Indigenous and non-Indigenous academics, scientists, and water management experts, this volume provides an overview of key water management challenges specific to Indigenous peoples, proposes possible policy solutions both at the international and national levels, and outlines culturally relevant tools for assessing vulnerability and building capacity. In recent decades, global climate change (particularly drought) has brought about additional water management challenges, especially in drought-prone regions where increasing average temperatures and diminishing precipitation are leading to water crises. Because their livelihoods are often dependent on the land and water, Indigenous groups native to those regions have direct insights into the localized impacts of global environmental change, and are increasingly developing their own adaptation and mitigation strategies and solutions based on local Indigenous knowledge (IK). Many Indigenous groups around the globe are also faced with mounting pressure from extractive industries like mining and forestry, which further threaten their water resources. The various cases presented in Indigenous Water and Drought Management in a Changing World provide much-needed insights into the particular issues faced by Indigenous peoples in preserving their water resources, as well as actionable information that can inform future scientific research and policymaking aimed at developing more integrated, region-specific, and culturally relevant solutions to these critical challenges. Includes diverse case studies from around the world Provides cutting-edge perspectives about Indigenous peoples’ water management issues and IK-based solutions Presents maps for most case studies along with a summary box to conclude each chapter

Category : Nature
Editor : Springer
ISBN : 9783319559827
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 413
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This book provides case studies and general views of the main processes involved in the ecosystem shifts occurring in the high mountains and analyses the implications for nature conservation. Case studies from the Pyrenees are preponderant, with a comprehensive set of mountain ranges surrounded by highly populated lowland areas also being considered. The introductory and closing chapters will summarise the main challenges that nature conservation may face in mountain areas under the environmental shifting conditions. Further chapters put forward approaches from environmental geography, functional ecology, biogeography, and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Organisms from microbes to large carnivores, and ecosystems from lakes to forest will be considered. This interdisciplinary book will appeal to researchers in mountain ecosystems, students and nature professionals. This book is open access under a CC BY license.

Category : Science
Editor : MDPI
ISBN : 9783039217960
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 258
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The research studies included in this Special Issue highlight the fundamental contribution of the knowledge of environmental history to conscious and efficient environment conservation and management. The long-term perspective of the dynamics that govern the human–climate ecosystem is becoming one of the main focuses of interest in biological and earth system sciences. Multidisciplinary bio-geo-archaeo investigations into the underlying processes of human impact on the landscape are crucial to envisage possible future scenarios of biosphere responses to global warming and biodiversity losses. This Special Issue seeks to engage an interdisciplinary dialog on the dynamic interactions between nature and society, focusing on long-term environmental data as an essential tool for better-informed landscape management decisions to achieve an equilibrium between conservation and sustainable resource exploitation.

Category : Business & Economics
Editor : Cornell University Press
ISBN : 9781501714993
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 277
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"This edited volume presents diverse case studies about the implications of civic ecology practices worldwide. It answers how civic ecology practices emerge, the role the practices play in the ability of communities and individuals to address social-ecological stresses, and given climate-associated disturbances, what strategies can be used to expand impacts of community driven practices to foster large-scale resilience and sustainability"--

Category : Nature
Editor : Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN : 9780198713043
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 231
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New approaches to conservation are required that aim to conserve ecological function and process, rather than attempt to protect static snapshots of biodiversity. To do this effectively, long-term information on ecosystem variability and resilience is needed. While there is a wealth of such information in palaeoecology, archaeology, and historical ecology, it remains an underused resource by conservation ecologists. In bringing together the disciplines of neo and palaeoecology and integrating them with conservation biology, this text illustrates how an understanding of long-term change in ecosystems can in turn inform and influence their conservation and management in the Anthropocene.

Category : Business & Economics
Editor : Cambridge University Press
ISBN : 9781108422505
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 349
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Discusses how culture both facilitates and inhibits our ability to address, live with, and make sense of climate change.

Category : Social Science
Editor : Routledge
ISBN : 9781000565935
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 460
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Designed to help students understand the multiple levels at which human populations respond to their surroundings, this essential text offers the most complete discussion of environmental, physiological, behavioral, and cultural adaptive strategies available. Among the unique features that make Human Adaptability outstanding as both a textbook for students and a reference book for professionals are a complete discussion of the development of ecological anthropology and relevant research methods; the use of an ecosystem approach with emphasis on arctic, high altitude, arid land, grassland, tropical rain forest, and urban environments; an extensive and updated bibliography on ecological anthropology; and a comprehensive glossary of technical terms. - There is enhanced emphasis throughout on the role of gender in human adaptability research and on global environmental change as it affects particular ecosystems. - Students are guided to websites that provide access to relevant material, complement the text's coverage of biomes, and suggest ways to become active in environmental issues. - The fourth edition includes updated material on climate change and environmental policy. This book is essential reading for students undertaking courses in environmental anthropology and human ecology.