Category : Social Science
Editor : Penguin
ISBN : 9781101589946
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 473
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A sweeping history of the Latino experience in the United States- thoroughly revised and updated. The first new edition in ten years of this important study of Latinos in U.S. history, Harvest of Empire spans five centuries-from the first New World colonies to the first decade of the new millennium. Latinos are now the largest minority group in the United States, and their impact on American popular culture-from food to entertainment to literature-is greater than ever. Featuring family portraits of real- life immigrant Latino pioneers, as well as accounts of the events and conditions that compelled them to leave their homelands, Harvest of Empire is required reading for anyone wishing to understand the history and legacy of this increasingly influential group.

Category : Social Science
Editor : Penguin
ISBN : 9780143119289
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 418
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A sweeping history of the Latino experience in the United States- thoroughly revised and updated. The first new edition in ten years of this important study of Latinos in U.S. history, Harvest of Empire spans five centuries-from the first New World colonies to the first decade of the new millennium. Latinos are now the largest minority group in the United States, and their impact on American popular culture-from food to entertainment to literature-is greater than ever. Featuring family portraits of real- life immigrant Latino pioneers, as well as accounts of the events and conditions that compelled them to leave their homelands, Harvest of Empire is required reading for anyone wishing to understand the history and legacy of this increasingly influential group.

Category : History
Editor : Penguin Group
ISBN : 9780140255393
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 465
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Spanning 500 years of Hispanic history, from the first New World colonies to the 19th century westward expansion in America, this narrative features family portraits of real-life immigrants along with sketches of the political events and social conditions that compelled them to leave their homeland.

Category : Education
Editor : Rethinking Schools Limited
ISBN : 0942961315
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 152
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Features lessons and readings on the history of the Mexican border and discusses both sides of the current debate on Mexican immigration.

Category : Political Science
Editor : Verso
ISBN : 0860916936
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 236
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Juan Gonzalez, described by the Village Voice as "the most radical person in the above-it-all world of New York daily journalism", is a reporter who takes as his beat the streets and projects of America's inner cities and the barrios across its southern borders. In these passionate and vivid despatches, he reports from the frontline of a social crisis which stretches from New York to Los Angeles, across the Rio Grande to Mexico's maquiladoras, through to Haiti, Honduras and Cuba. Written not just about the ghetto, but from it, Gonzalez's stories portray workers on strike, refugees on the run, owners on the make and a journalist on the case. Together they bring us face to face with "human beings whose tragedies illuminate the landscape of a forgotten America".

Category : History
Editor : Simon and Schuster
ISBN : 9781416597155
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 384
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*Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award* *A New York Times Notable Book* *Winner of the Texas Book Award and the Oklahoma Book Award* This New York Times bestseller and stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West “is nothing short of a revelation…will leave dust and blood on your jeans” (The New York Times Book Review). Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads, and the amazing story of Cynthia Ann Parker and her son Quanah—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being. Hailed by critics, S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

Category : History
Editor : Routledge
ISBN : 9781136071706
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 226
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This study argues for a radically new interpretation of the origins and evolution of the ethnic Mexican community across the US. This book offers a definitive account of the interdependent histories of the US and Mexico as well as the making of the Chicano population in America. The authors link history to contemporary issues, emphasizing the overlooked significance of late 19th and 20th century US economic expansionism to Europe in the formation of the Mexican community.

Category : History
Editor : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN : 9781461665786
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 324
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It is well known that large numbers of Europeans migrated overseas during the century preceding the Great Depression of 1930, and that a great many of them went to the United States. What is not well known, particularly in the United States, is that more than 20 percent of these migrants emigrated to Latin America, and that they significantly influenced the demographic, economic, and cultural evolution of many areas in the region. Individuals have migrated to Latin America since the beginning of the Conquest more than 500 years ago, but by far the largest number, 10 million, migrated from 1870 to 1930. This incredible influx was also concentrated in terms of the origins and destinations of the individuals: three-quarters came from the Iberian peninsula and Italy, while 91 percent relocated to just three countries-Argentina (50 percent), Brazil (36 percent), and Uruguay (5 percent). Mass Migration to Modern Latin America includes original contributions from more than a dozen of the leading scholars of the new methodologically and theoretically innovative Latin American migration history that has emerged during the past 20 years. Although the authors focus primarily on the nature and impact of mass migration to Argentina and Brazil from 1870 to 1930, they place their analysis in broader historical and comparative contexts. They link the mass migrations at the turn of the past century to older migratory traditions and existing social networks, some of which had their roots in the colonial period. The editors begin each section of the book with personal stories of individual immigrants and their families, providing students with a glimpse into the complex process of migration and how it played out in various situations. This text will help readers understand that Latin America is more than a "traditional society," composed of the descendants of the Conquistadors and Native Americans. This book demonstrates the crucial impact of the mass migrations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth c

Category : Juvenile Fiction
Editor : Penguin
ISBN : 9780735230958
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 48
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From New York Times bestseller and Pulitzer Prize winner Junot Díaz comes a debut picture book about the magic of memory and the infinite power of the imagination. A 2019 Pura Belpré Honor Book for Illustration Every kid in Lola's school was from somewhere else. Hers was a school of faraway places. So when Lola's teacher asks the students to draw a picture of where their families immigrated from, all the kids are excited. Except Lola. She can't remember The Island—she left when she was just a baby. But with the help of her family and friends, and their memories—joyous, fantastical, heartbreaking, and frightening—Lola's imagination takes her on an extraordinary journey back to The Island. As she draws closer to the heart of her family's story, Lola comes to understand the truth of her abuela's words: “Just because you don't remember a place doesn't mean it's not in you.” Gloriously illustrated and lyrically written, Islandborn is a celebration of creativity, diversity, and our imagination's boundless ability to connect us—to our families, to our past and to ourselves.

Category : Social Science
Editor : Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN : 9780807899380
Type : PDF, Epub and Kindle
Language : en
Views : 225
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Over recent decades, the Southeast has become a new frontier for Latin American migration to and within the United States, and North Carolina has had one of the fastest growing Latino populations in the nation. Here, Hannah Gill offers North Carolinians from all walks of life a better understanding of their Latino neighbors, bringing light instead of heat to local and national debates on immigration. Exploring the larger social forces behind demographic shifts, Gill shows both how North Carolina communities are facing the challenges and opportunities presented by these changes and how migrants experience the economic and social realities of their new lives. Latinos are no longer just visitors to the state but are part of the inevitably changing, long-term makeup of its population. Today, emerging migrant communities and the integration of Latino populations remain salient issues as the U.S. Congress stands on the verge of formulating comprehensive immigration reform for the first time in nearly three decades. Gill makes connections between hometowns and the increasing globalization of people, money, technology, and culture by shedding light on the many diverse North Carolina residents who are highly visible yet, as she shows, invisible at the same time.